EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
TALES OF HOFFMANN
AND MORE!

 

CAST

HOFFMAN, a poet

FOUR HEROINES
    STELLA, the opera singer
    OLYMPIA, a mechanical doll
   
GIULIETTA, a courtesan
   
ANTONIA, a young girl

FOUR VILLAINS
    LINDORF
    COPPÉLIUS
    DAPERTUTTO
    DR. MIRACLE

NICKLAUSSE/ANTONIA'S MOTHER

FOUR SERVANTS
    ANDRÈS
    COCHENILLE
    PITICHINACCIO
   FRANTZ

LUTHER/CRESPEL

NATHANAEL/SPALANZANI

HERMANN/SCHLEMIL

WON WHI CHOI, tenor

LAURA LEÓN, soprano



 

DENNIS JESSE, baritone



 

KIMBERLY SOGIOKA, mezzo-soprano

ALEX MANSOORI, tenor



 

THOMAS POTTER, bass

SAMUEL HALL, tenor

BENJAMIN LUDWIG, baritone

CREATIVE TEAM

JORGE PARODI
EVE SUMMER

GRANT PREISSER
KIM  WELBORN
ERMA SANDORA
JON WHITELEY

MICHELLE ENGLEMAN

CONDUCTOR
STAGE DIRECTOR

SCENIC DESIGNER
COSTUME DESIGNER
HAIR & MAKEUP DESIGNER
LIGHTING DESIGNER

PRODUCTION STAGE MANAGER

SYNOPSIS

Prologue

The beautiful opera singer Stella has sent the poet E.T.A Hoffmann a letter requesting that he meet her in her dressing room that evening after her performance, but Stella’s letter is intercepted by evil Councilor Lindorf, Hoffmann’s nemesis. Hoffmann arrives to the tavern and begins entertaining the crowd with a legend of a dwarf named Kleinzach. Everyone is entertained, but eventually Lindorf coaxes Hoffmann to tell the crowd the stories of his three great loves. Hoffman obliges.

Act I (OLYMPIA)

Hoffman’s first lover turns out to be a life size doll. Her name is Olympia and she is the creation of mad scientist Spalanzani and this act’s incarnation of evil, Coppelius. Coppelius sells Hoffmann a pair of magical glasses which allow Hoffmann to perceive Olympia as human. The instant he sees her this way, Hoffmann falls in love even though Nicklausse knows the truth and tries to convince Hoffman not to fall in love with her. Hoffmann ignores Nicklausse’s suggestion and begins dancing with the life sized doll. Mid-dance he falls on the floor, breaking his magical glasses. At the same time Coppelius appears and tears Olympia to pieces in retaliation for his partner Spalanzani swindling him out of his fair share of compensation for the creation of the doll. At that moment Hoffmann is struck with the harsh reality that he had in fact been in love with a mechanical doll.

Act II (GIULIETTA)

Hoffmann’s second lover is a courtesan named Giulietta. She is not actually in love with him, but rather is seducing him under the orders of the evil magician Dappertutto. She has been promised a diamond if she can steal Hoffmann’s mirrored reflection. Giulietta succeeds in getting closer to Hoffmann, and consequently he does fall in love.  Schlemil, another victim of Giulietta and Dapertutto’s evil scheme, and who is still full of jealousy and rage, challenges Hoffmann to a duel and loses. Nicklausse leaves Hoffmann’s side in search of horses to take him away from Venice. While Nicklausse is away, Hoffman gives into Giulietta’s temptation and surrenders his reflection to her. Knowing that Nicklausse is on his way back to save Hoffmann, evil Dappertutto prepares a poison for him, but Giulietta accidentally drinks it instead and falls dead in the arms of Hoffmann.

Act III (ANTONIA)

Hoffmann’s third lover is a singer, Antonia, who is very ill with the same mysterious disease from which her mother died. Trying to protect his daughter from suffering an untimely death as her mother suffered, Antonia’s father Crespel forbids her from singing. Crespel also forbids her from seeing her lover Hoffmann, but when Crespel leaves the house, Hoffmann sneaks in and unknowingly endangers Antonia by encouraging her to sing. Upon returning home, Crespel meets this act’s incarnation of evil, Dr. Miracle. The evil doctor convinces Crespel to allow him to “heal” his daughter. Overhearing the men's conversation, Hoffmann learns that Antonia will die if she continues singing and makes her promise that she will not sing again. She reluctantly agrees and Hoffmann leaves her alone. Dr. Miracle returns after Hoffmann’s departure and convinces her to follow her mother’s path by conjuring a vision of the dead mother. Antonia sings and Crespel returns home in time to witness Antonia’s demise.  At that moment, Hoffmann enters the room and Crespel, believing him to be responsible for his daughter’s death, threatens to kill Hoffmann. Nicklausse intervenes and saves his friend from the wrath of the bereaved father.

Epilogue

At the end of the opera, we return to the tavern where the opera began. Hoffmann is drunk, swearing to Nicklausse that he will never love again. We realize that the three loves of Hoffmann’s life represent three different facets of his current love interest, Stella the opera singer. Stella is growing tired of waiting for Hoffmann to meet her and enters the tavern only to find him drunk. Upon laying eyes on Stella, Hoffmann tells her to leave and that he will not follow her anymore. Lindorf, who has been hiding in the corner of the tavern steps forward revealing himself to Stella. She realizes that Hoffmann is no longer in love with her and leaves with Lindorf, the first and last representation of evil in the opera.


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